Thursday, June 10, 2021

How To Paint Interior Doors Black



Here's how to paint your interior doors black. Spoiler alert: it's very easy!

Recently we decided to paint our basement walls white. (They were previously yellow.) We have a walk-out basement, with good natural light in the main living area, and I wanted it to have less of a basement feel and more of a bright "upstairs" kind of feel. I think a fresh white backdrop is great for displaying colorful artwork and mementos too. Plus, I'm just not a basement kind of gal. I think there's a reason they call them man caves!

With fresh white walls, we saw that the basement doors could use freshening up too. We have four storage closets with doors, as well as a bathroom door, a door to the storage room and a door to my husband's little "music room." In fact, the small hallway at the bottom of the stairs is basically a confusion of doors. (We were excited about all the extra storage space when we moved into this house and then we quickly filled it up - but I digress.) 

We knew that we wanted to use Fusion Mineral Paint for our interior doors. We have used it for furniture and for our front exterior door and it's a dream to work with. It goes on beautifully and has no unpleasant odour (and zero VOCs). Fusion Mineral Paint is also very durable and has a built-in top coat. We have even used it on outdoor flower boxes and it holds up to rain and snow for quite a long time. We were provided with Fusion Mineral Paint and other tools for our project, but I reached out to partner with them again because I love the paint so much.

Here's how we went about painting our basement interior doors black. (It was so easy and it has made such a difference in the space.)


What color to paint interior doors


Obviously you can paint your interior doors any color you want. If you are a fan of color, go for it. (Teal or pink, anyone?) Most interior doors are white, clearly, but black is an increasingly popular option too. We debated whether to paint the basement interior doors black or white. Our thought process was that white would add to the overall bright and airy feel we desired, but black would be more sophisticated and unique. We ultimately decided on black, because it's unexpected in a basement and might give the space that "upstairs" feel I was going for. We also had some experience with black doors, having painted our front exterior door with Fusion Mineral Paint in Coal Black. We decided to use Coal Black again because we love it so much.



Can interior doorknobs be painted?


We chose not to paint the doorknobs on our basement interior doors because we liked the original gold doorknobs against the black door paint. But, can you paint interior doorknobs? Yes. We have done it in other areas of our home and it works quite well. Painting door knobs is super easy too. Ideally you remove the doorknob first and bring it out to the garage or an outdoor space for good ventilation. 

Then, just clean the doorknob, allow it to dry and spray paint it. Give it two or three coats, with time for drying in between. Let the spray paint dry thoroughly before putting the door knobs back on the doors (after your doors are painted too of course). 

You choose the color! A nice bronze is a good option. You can also do black or gold. Choose a matte finish or glossy, depending on your preference. Save the money you would have spent on new hardware and buy yourself something else, like a comfy chair to curl up in.

Our basement interior doors before painting:


Before shot of basement interior doors before painting


We had standard white builder grade hollow interior doors. There was nothing wrong with them - they were just kind of boring and in need of a fresh coat of paint. (I didn't take a really bad "before" photo on purpose, although it looks like I did. There is zero natural light in this part of the basement, so this photo is a lovely combo of crookedness and garish overhead lighting.) 

How to paint interior doors with Fusion Mineral Paint


removing doorknob from interior door for painting

Step 1. Remove doorknobs (if needed)


If you want to paint your interior door without manoeuvring around doorknobs, remove the knobs. This will be a necessity if you want to spray paint the doorknobs - take them outside or to a well ventilated area for spray painting. You can also keep the doorknobs on if you aren't going to paint them. Tape them off with some painter's tape to avoid getting paint on them.

You could also remove the doors from their hinges entirely to paint them on a flat surface, but that seems a bit of a pain to me. We figured nobody's going to see the parts you can't reach with paint - like the bottoms of the doors and the hinged sides. And if you remove the doors and lie them flat, you'll have to wait for one side to dry before painting the other side. 


using-fusion-tsp-on-interior-door

Step 2. Clean your doors


Cleaning the doors isn't a big deal. Don't let it turn you off of starting your paint project. Just give them a quick clean with Fusion Mineral Paint's TSP alternative to get rid of dirt, grease, (food probably if your house is anything like mine) and fingerprints. Cleaning the doors will help the paint to adhere better. Fusion's TSP is a water-based degreaser with no phosphates. In a bucket, mix two full caps of TSP alternative with 2 litres of water. Use a clean, lint-free cloth to wipe down the doors. Allow to dry.


cutting-in-with-fusion-mineral-paint-in-coal-black-on-interior-door

Step 3. Use a paint brush to paint recessed areas of the door


Thankfully, there's often no need for sanding of interior doors. Fusion has great adhesion and in many cases doesn't require sanding of your surface. Check the Fusion Mineral Paint website for more details. (It may be a different story if you have an old door with some kind of high gloss oil-based paint or a wooden door with peeling paint. If you do sand, be sure to wipe away any residual material before painting.) 

A roller brush is super handy for painting doors quickly and smoothly, but you'll want to hit the recessed areas with a small paint brush first. We used one of Fusion's synthetic paint brushes. Fusion Mineral paint is self-levelling so brush strokes are minimal anyway, but use longer strokes and thinner coats to keep the paint as smooth as possible. 

Keep a damp cloth handy in case you paint any areas you shouldn't - like trim or hinges. 


rolling-fusion-mineral-paint-in-coal-black-onto-interior-door

Step 4. Roll on a first coat of paint


Fusion also makes these handy little microfiber rollers that are the perfect size for painting doors. If you think painting black over white is going to take some time, never fear, two coats of Fusion Mineral Paint in Coal Black were all that we needed to get great coverage over the white doors. My husband is impressed every time we use Fusion and he really doesn't compliment many products at all. 

Allow the first coat to dry before proceeding to the next coat of paint.
 

rolling-on-second-coat-of-coal-black-fusion-mineral-paint-interior-door


Step 5. Roll on a second coat of paint (aka the most fun part)


Roll on a second coat of Fusion Mineral Paint in Coal Black and watch your doors transform! It's a thing of beauty. And you won't have to do this again for a long time!

Step 6. Let the doors dry


Let the paint dry for a few hours before shutting the doors or re-attaching the doorknobs. Enjoy your clean, transformed basement doors!



I must confess I still don't hang out in the basement all that much, but when I do go down there to do crafting or use the treadmill I am always pleasantly "surprised" by the beauty of our doors, painted in Coal Black. The overall look is much more sophisticated and the builder grade doors don't look boring anymore. We also spent a (very) long time decluttering the basement and it has made such a difference. We would love to remove the carpeting soon and install a nice laminate flooring to freshen the whole space even more. In the meantime, though, we're going to enjoy the basement as it stands - less "man cave" and more woman-friendly.


Questions for you

Have you painted any of your interior doors? What color? Are you a fan of basement living or do you leave that to somebody else? Or maybe you don't have a basement? (They are common in our part of the world but not elsewhere I know.)

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